Dead Man Walking

Name: Dead Man Walking
Year: 1995
Rating: R
Running Time (minutes): 122
Description: A convicted murderer on Death Row and the nun who befriends him. Through the portrayal of finely drawn characters and their interactions as the days, hours, and minutes tick down to the condemned man’s execution, powerful emotions are unleashed. While Matthew Poncelet and Sister Prejean desperately try to gain a stay of execution from the governor or the courts, scenes are intercut from the brutal crime, gradually revealing the truth about the events that transpired. In addition to her temporal help, the nun also tries to reach out spiritually and assist as a guide to salvation.
1995 Oscar Winner!
1995 Oscar Best Actress: Susan Sarandon
Stars: Susan Sarandon, Sean Penn, Robert Prosky
Genres: Crime, Drama

What surprised me most was how I hated the guy on death row at the start, but felt more and more emotional as the story unfolded. Still finding it hard to sympathise with him, but that didn’t make the whole ordeal more bearable. The score is sufficient, but I honestly don’t understand why it sounds to Eastern and there should have been more music.

Braveheart

Name: Braveheart
Year: 1995
Rating: R
Running Time (minutes): 177
Description: William Wallace is a Scottish rebel who leads an uprising against the cruel English ruler Edward the Longshanks, who wishes to inherit the crown of Scotland for himself. When he was a young boy, William Wallace’s father and brother, along with many others, lost their lives trying to free Scotland. Once he loses another of his loved ones, William Wallace begins his long quest to make Scotland free once and for all, along with the assistance of Robert the Bruce.
Stars: Mel Gibson, Sophie Marceau and Patrick McGoohan
1995 Oscar Best Picture!
Genres: Action, Biography, Drama, History, War

Slightly too long, but good all the same. I did become tired of Gibson always riding on, and shouting to, his horse whenever he was angry (pretty much half the time), though. His second love interest didn’t convince me either.

I loved the score and can’t understand why people even bother criticising James Horner’s self-referencing tactics or inappropriate instruments. As long as the score works, which it did, there’s no problem for me.
Braveheart