I, Robot

Name: I, Robot
Year: 2004
Rating: PG
Running Time (minutes): 115
Description: Set in a future Earth (2035 A.D.) where robots are common assistants and workers for their human owners, this is the story of “robotophobic” Chicago Police Detective Del Spooner’s investigation into the murder of Dr Alfred Lanning, who works at U.S. Robotics, in which a robot, Sonny, appears to be implicated, even though that would mean the robot had violated the Three Laws of Robotics, which is apparently impossible. It seems impossible because… if robots can break those laws, there’s nothing to stop them from taking over the world, as humans have grown to become completely dependent upon their robots. Or maybe… they already have? Aiding Spooner in his investigation is a psychologist, Dr Susan Calvin, who specializes in the psyches of robots.
Stars: Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan and Bruce Greenwood
Genres: Action, Mystery, Sci-Fi

Pretty good. Will Smith’s ‘aaarghs’ did sound extremely similar.

The score worked but was unmemorable. The sound effects were nicely distributed across all the channels.

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Catwoman

Name: Catwoman
Year: 2004
Rating: PG-13
Running Time (minutes): 104
Description: Catwoman is the story of shy, sensitive artist Patience Philips, a woman who can’t seem to stop apologizing for her own existence. She works as a graphic designer for Hedare Beauty, a mammoth cosmetics company on the verge of releasing a revolutionary anti-aging product. When Patience inadvertently happens upon a dark secret her employer is hiding, she finds herself in the middle of a corporate conspiracy. What happens next changes Patience forever. In a mystical twist of fate, she is transformed into a woman with the strength, speed, agility and ultra-keen senses of a cat. With her newfound prowess and feline intuition, Patience becomes Catwoman, a sleek and stealthy creature balancing on the thin line between good and bad. Like any wildcat, she’s dangerous, elusive and untamed. Her adventures are complicated by a burgeoning relationship with Tom Lone, a cop who has fallen for Patience but cannot shake his fascination with the mysterious Catwoman…
Stars: Halle Berry, Sharon Stone and Benjamin Bratt
Genres: Action, Crime, Fantasy

Okay, uh, what was that? I’d have liked it if the company had accidentally turned her into Catwoman with one of their products, but this… Senseless action, stupid plot twists (cats reviving humans, for God’s sake…) I just kept watching because it was too late to start watching anything else. This was really ridiculous. Sharon Stone’s husband has the worst fake British accent I’ve ever heard. Pff, waste of time.

One interesting note about the audio description: they used a woman for the story, but a man to read the credits. Nice touch.

The Forgotten

Name: The Forgotten
Year: 2004
Rating: PG-13
Running Time (minutes): 91
Description: A grieving mother, Telly Paretta, is struggling to cope with the loss of her 9-year-old son. She is stunned when her psychiatrist and her husband tell her that she has created eight years of memories of a son she never had. But when she meets the father of one of her son’s friends who is having the same experience, Telly embarks on a mission to prove her son’s existence and her sanity.
Stars: Julianne Moore, Dominic West and Christopher Kovaleski
Genres: Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi

It wasn’t bad, certainly not as bad as Rotten Tomatoes claims it is. The only huge flaw came when Julianne Moore says to her sidekick: ‘Do you think your daughter is still alive?’ And then he goes, ‘Maybe, yeah, I dunno,’ in such a ridiculously uninterested manner that it was laughable. But the plot itself was quite interesting and I liked how they kept up the tension till the very end. The very last scene, however, ruins it. Julianne Moore is great as usual, but, also as usual, tends to overplay the frantic part. But what’s worse, Moore being frantic or telling Moore at the very end that – spoiler alert! – the aliens did it? If you’ve got Julianne Moore as your protagonist, put a little thought into it, for God’s sake.

James Horner’s score is effective and at times quite moving (the opening cue, for instance). I didn’t really like the electric guitar, but the Inception-like dreamy sound effects at the end were quite interesting.